‘Government is Responsible for our Culture of Bad Debt’ – Article in the Press and Journal – 16th Dec 2014

‘Owe no man nothing’ says the Good Book.
For years Scots brought up on the teaching of the Bible did their best to fulfil that instruction.
Our reputation for meanness was undeserved because in reality our thrift and canniness with money meant that we had more to give.
No more because according to a report by Accountant in Bankruptcy the number of people in Scotland being taken to court is more than 1,000 per day.
Various reasons have been given for this; from the increased powers given to local authorities to pursue debtors, to the ongoing effects of the recession.
Perhaps though there are other factors we need to take into account.
For example the kind of human greed and consumerism exemplified by people fighting over discounted TVs in supermarkets on the so-called Black Friday?
But there is more to it than that – much more. We are a culture built on debt.
Christians Against Poverty (CAP) is one of the foremost debt help agencies in the UK.
My own congregation has a CAP centre in our church building.
The stories of debt that I have heard are incredible.
CAP are doing wonderful work and have helped tens of thousands of people get out of debt, but it is a long, hard process teaching people the basic principle that you should not spend what you do not have.
A principle that is made even harder when the government does not even pretend to practise it.
Britain is at least £1.4trillion in debt – £25,000 for every single man, woman and child – some reckon that the real debt is three times that.
There is an old Italian proverb that says: “He who leaves God out of his reckoning does not know how to count.”
Perhaps, as we as a society have abandoned the spiritual and become consumerist materialists, seeing life only in terms of what we own, it is little wonder that the things that money can buy don’t ultimately satisfy, and that our debts of every kind, just keep on piling up.
The Rev David Robertson is the moderator-elect of the Free Church of Scotland and minister of St Peter’s Free Church in Dundee

This article appeared in the P and J- it was edited from the one I sent which went on to speak about Jesus being the one who forgives us our debts – but it is good to get this into the national press.

2 thoughts on “‘Government is Responsible for our Culture of Bad Debt’ – Article in the Press and Journal – 16th Dec 2014

  1. With the country being £1.4 trillion or more in debt with choices made by those in political power, is it any wonder that this has filtered down to the rest of society? I remember the old “mend and make do” and “is this a need to have or a want to have” approach of previous generations. Perhaps it is difficult to be like this when much of culture is not and and getting credit is easy? I remember as a young man wanting a car that perhaps was beyond my means and getting turned down by a bank manager for a loan! Also what I heard a lot growing up was “we can’t afford it”.

    Great to hear that CAP is doing a great job in tackling debt. Perhaps what also needs to happen is a strong influence in culture in being proactive in not getting into debt in the first place?

    Oh and by the way – thanks for this David. I was needing a nudge to pay off my student loan!

  2. Here in the States, our debt is driven by big businesses as they continue to implement the ideology of State Capitalism. Whether you have Obamacare, legislation that prohibits the government from negotiating lower pharmaceutical prices for Medicare, military aid to foreign countries, or our Military Industrial Complex benefiting from the military budgets, big business is driving government to go into debt to provide profits for big business.

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